Exploring Your Relationship with Time (3)

How do you want to spend the time you have left?

With every minute of every day, we are choosing how to spend our time. By saying yes to one activity, we are, by definition, saying no to another. By being present in this room, for example, you have chosen to devote time to personal and professional growth, learning, community and enjoyment.  There are many ways you could spend this morning. But here you are.

What values are you honouring by being in this room?

In general, how do your choices about how you spend your time reflect your highest values?

NLP Concept: Cause > Effect

 Which side of the equation are you on?

When you are on the Cause side of the equation you are aware of what is important to you (your Values) and you make conscious choices about how you spend your time that serve you in the long term (Deferred Gratification). When you are at Cause you remember to ask yourself:

“What is it that I am not doing while I am choosing to lie in, watch TV, have a coffee and so on, and what are the consequences of choosing NOT to do y and z, and what does it cost me?

When you make choices about how to spend your time it’s important to recognise that an infinite number of possibilities are not chosen. You need to be constantly aware of the choices you are making; remember to ask yourself ‘What are the consequences of doing x?’, AND ‘What are the consequences of choosing NOT to do y and z?’

Conversely, when you are on the Effect side of the equation you lack control; you do not make conscious choices about how to spend your time based on what is important to you. You may not even appreciate that you are able to choose / that you have a choice. Choices are made unconsciously and usually serve you in the short term (Spontaneous Gratification).

Typically when people are ‘at Effect’ they make excuses for their behaviour and will often blame others for their lack of achievement. Their language is typified by statements such as

  • I didn’t have time
  • Time just passes me by
  • There’s not enough time
  • Time escapes me

Often the consequences of the choices you make are not immediately obvious. As an example of how increments add up, studies show that the average American spends 40% of his/her free time watching television. Over an average lifetime, that amounts to ten years. One decade. Is this choice consciously made?

What have you learned so far about how you spend your time?

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